Thu

13

Nov

2014

Introducing The Ball Rooms

A few weeks ago, I got an email from an Alcazar player named Arthur Ball. He made the second puzzle generator in the history of Alcazar, and gave me the following puzzle, as an example.

 

Click on the image to solve the puzzle in the app or in your browser.

 

After a few minutes of trying the puzzle, I realized that it was one of the most challenging Alcazar I had ever tried. It can still be solved by pure logic, but one must be very clever to find the points where the puzzle offers the least resistance.


At that point, I was planning a new series of puzzles for the app for experts only. Something that is more difficult than any other puzzle in the app, without being too large. Arthur was very interested in collaborating, and he accepted the challenge.

 

And that's the story of the new book of puzzles: The Ball Rooms. Update your Android app to try all 30 puzzles in this collection. For those with an iOS device, don't worry, you'll be able to play on your device in just a few weeks.


You can also...

 - Follow this link to try the first puzzle of the book, or

 - See a step by step method to solve it, published on Edderiofer's puzzle blog.


Have fun!


Write a comment

Comments: 4
  • #1

    edderiofer (Thursday, 13 November 2014 21:29)

    For a bigger challenge, try solving it without using uniqueness logic (as a puzzle purist, I consider this to be taboo). I have just solved this puzzle without, so I assure you it is possible to do so.

    And yes, before anyone asks, this is the exact same "edderiofer" who created the "Excellent Hand-Made Alcazar".

  • #2

    Allan (Sunday, 16 November 2014 08:35)

    Just finished this set of puzzles and I enjoyed them a lot. Definitely the most difficult set of Alcazar puzzles. Although I did have to rely on guessing and backtracking a lot the way I play. I tried to use Edderiofer's checkerboard parity trick but I found it really difficult to find the right region to apply it, although it did help sometimes.

  • #3

    Jérôme Morin-Drouin (Saturday, 22 November 2014 12:55)

    Indeed, the checkerboard parity can be hard to apply in large irregular zones. But often, when you find a clue through complex backtracking, you can see that one can reach the same conclusion by using this technique on the right zone. In other words, you can use trial and error to become better at not using trial and error.

  • #4

    Jerry (Wednesday, 26 November 2014 11:45)

    Very nice puzzle. Can't wait till the iOS version of the app gets out!

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